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Kern2123 Kern2123 Kern2123 Kern2123
Kern2123 Kern2123 Kern2123 Kern2123

Kern2123

$2,000.00

Sale Pending

"Menagerie"

Hand painted with multiple layers of underglaze, it takes 6 layers to create the background blends and an additional 5-10 layers for any over laid colors. Painted on bone dry clay, fired to cone 04 and clear glazed.

4.5 x 4.5 x 3.6" H

 

Terri Kern about the process "I made several pieces in this tilted form series by throwing slightly closed bowl forms on the wheel. When the bowl was dry enough to handle, I trimmed the clay (usually left at the bottom of the piece to form the foot) completely off. After deciding what angle would work best to create the tilted form, I used a wooden paddle to create a flat area that would act as the new bottom of the piece. A combination of hand made stencils and surface drawing with a pencil were used to lay out my design and create the narrative imagery on this piece. I wanted to increase the tactile quality of the surface so I carved the turtles, seaweed and jellyfish in relief along with a subtle wave pattern in the background. I typically use 5-7 different carving tools to get the results I’m looking for. After the piece dried completely, I painted the surface with multiple layers of underglaze, all before firing the piece in the kiln for the first time. The carving in the background of the piece helps create a subtle, dappled effect as the painted underglaze clings more heavily to the recessed areas. To help add to the feeling of movement on the surface, there are areas where I used an exacto knife to split black painted lines in half, allowing the background color to show through. It’s easiest to see this detail on the spotted pattern of the sea snake which is painted around the bottom of the piece in the other photo. I balanced the form on metal stilts during the second firing so that the entire surface could be finished with a clear glaze. I love that the tilted interior slowly reveals itself as the viewer walks around the piece to discover a couple of painted fish swimming near the bottom. In order to paint the details in the interior, my brushes are held near the end of their handles. I usually hold my breath while painting each delicate outline and the individual detail lines in the interior because any movement can cause a miscalculation."

Learn more about the Artist: Terri Kern

 

A note from the artist:

"I made several pieces in this tilted form series by throwing slightly closed bowl forms on the wheel. When the bowl was dry enough to handle, I trimmed the clay (usually left at the bottom of the piece to form the foot) completely off. After deciding what angle would work best to create the tilted form, I used a wooden paddle to create a flat area that would act as the new bottom of the piece. A combination of hand made stencils and surface drawing with a pencil were used to lay out my design and create the narrative imagery on this piece."

"I wanted to increase the tactile quality of the surface so I carved the turtles, seaweed and jellyfish in relief along with a subtle wave pattern in the background. I typically use 5-7 different carving tools to get the results I’m looking for. After the piece dried completely, I painted the surface with multiple layers of underglaze, all before firing the piece in the kiln for the first time. The carving in the background of the piece helps create a subtle, dappled effect as the painted underglaze clings more heavily to the recessed areas. To help add to the feeling of movement on the surface, there are areas where I used an exacto knife to split black painted lines in half, allowing the background color to show through. It’s easiest to see this detail on the spotted pattern of the sea snake which is painted around the bottom of the piece in the other photo. I balanced the form on metal stilts during the second firing so that the entire surface could be finished with a clear glaze."

"I love that the tilted interior slowly reveals itself as the viewer walks around the piece to discover a couple of painted fish swimming near the bottom. In order to paint the details in the interior, my brushes are held near the end of their handles. I usually hold my breath while painting each delicate outline and the individual detail lines in the interior because any movement can cause a miscalculation"

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